Schools

St. Francis of Assisi Primary School, Skelmersdale

27 April – 12 June


LETTER FROM KHUDADAD KHAN   ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear Father,

 

Things are grim in the trenches and I miss home.

 

The howling of bullets, the cries of pain; the screams of death:-

This is the war of all wars.

 

I was manning the guns with my Baluchi comrades

When all of my team were wounded or killed.
I never stopped firing my gun.
Tried to be brave when fighting the Hun.

So many dead bodies – I couldn’t count ‘em.
I pretended to be dead to escape the enemy.

 

They call me ‘the average Indian boy
Who became a mighty Sepoy’.
The first, whose valour despite pain and loss
Was awarded the Victoria Cross.

 

Father, I hope I’ve made you proud.

 

Your son

 

Khudadad Khan


Bobbie-Jo

I loved doing the show because I had the part of the officer. Thank you Trench Brothers

Shannon - Costumed Interpreter

I think the best thing was how he always seemed to stay in character and didn’t ever stop! He made us all laugh at some point and it was also really good when we actually got to learn some of the different phrases.

Lilleigh - Composition

(I learnt) that if we try hard then we will be able to achieve great things

Shannon - Puppet Making

We got to make our puppets in our own way. She told us what we had to do and we did it our own way which makes each of our puppets unique! I also loved what she wrote on our whiteboard! ‘There is no such thing as can’t, TRY!’

Michael - Performance

The best thing about the day was when I heard the professional singers. And when we sung Trench Brothers together. I loved the show keep up the good work 🙂

Keegan - Artefact Handling

I liked when we got to handle the weapons and gas masks and when we got to hold the Victorian cross, there lots of amazing things that they used in WW1

Abigail - Puppet Making

I loved making the head of the puppet because it was the most creative one and Uzma helped me get things right.

Lilia - Costumed Interpreter

The best thing was when he pulled out people for laughing, sniggering or even smiling. The actor was so realistic I actually thought that I was in the real life army. I learned how people were treated in the war, how they got trained, what they were called and even learned some of the Hindu language.

Lilia - Composition

The best thing was when we all sat together and listened to him and made a song. He had a very bubbly personality, and he had a great sense of humour. I learnt how to make music, that the piano is a beautiful musical instrument and that song writing is amazing.


Actors in the final performance pose with veterans that had been invited to see the show.

francisveterans

St. Philip’s Primary School, Nelson

20 April – 15 June


LETTER FROM NORMAN MANLEY   ST. PHILIP’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear Edna,

 

I miss you so much, I hate to see you ache with tears.

 

These comrades of mine are first class thieves.

They would rob your last farthing.

But they’re like brothers to me.

I have never known anyone like them.

We look out for each other.

 

I can see bombs raining down like snow,

And hundreds of bodies scattered around.

How many bombs and bullets will it take to beat the other side?

 

I was promoted to Lance Corporal, and looking forward to working with my fellow brothers.

But they didn’t trust or respect me, because of the colour of my skin.

Surely, we all have the same goal?

We need to work as one.

 

I have already lost my brother Roy.

Words can’t begin to describe how I feel.

My heart aches, I can’t imagine life without my brother Roy.

 

Dear Edna, you are my shield to protect me.

Your caring words comfort me.

 

Your loving fiancée

 

Norman Manley


Jennifer Barnes - Teacher

It was even better than I had imagined. Excellent staffing / great support available from the team. Pleasure to work alongside the team. Fabulous for their confidence! Great also for their writing – we loved the cross-curricular work (diaries / letters). Can’t praise the project enough. Would love to be involved again in the project. Loved the experience from start to finish – the children and I have loved it.

Hadija - Composition

I got to express my voice. The song written was by our school. I was excited to sing the song we had made. I learnt to project my voice. I was able to come up with ideas for the composition.

Dawood - Performance

The best thing was using my puppet and my Auntie was able to watch the performance.

Aminat - Costumed Interpreter

We found out what life was like for soldiers who were at war. I enjoyed being a soldier and doing the marching. I discovered what life was like for soldiers who were away from families.

Jennifer Barnes - Teacher

Providing the children with great range of material to look at (which may normally be behind a glass cabinet in a museum). All were able to discuss the artefacts in a more in-depth way.

Hadija - Artefact Handling

I liked seeing the artefacts from the war (like the weapons and peep holes). The man gave us lots of new information.

Bispham Endowed Primary School, Blackpool

26 April – 19 June


LETTER FROM MANTA SINGH  BISPHAM ENDOWED PRIMARY

My dearest Mother and Father,

 

In the trenches, it was filthy, cold and miserable.

Flies buzzing all around us. Stagnant water.

Smells of rotten bodies, rotten food, burning fires and acrid smoke.

But I was proud to be on the front line.

 

Exploding shells threw earth and mud into the air.

Horrifically injured men were caught up in barbed wire.

I found an old wheelbarrow and used it for a stretcher for one of my British brothers –

Lieutenant George Henderson.

I too was injured when I saved him.

 

I’m lying in a hospital bed in Brighton, far, far away from home. Feeling anxious.

There’s a stinging pain, a burning and agonising pain in my leg.

But I know I’ve made my Havildar proud.

 

As I feel life draining from my body, my mind drifts back to my childhood days in our village in the Punjab.

I miss you with all my heart,

I miss you with all my heart.

 

Your loving son

Manta Singh


Olivia - Artefact Handling

I learnt about the Periscope and they used it so they didn’t have to pop their head up and risk getting shot in the head.

Harry - Costumed Interpreter

The best thing about this activity is that it was realistic. The worst thing about this activity was it was not real.

Lailah - Puppet Making

We learnt how to make the puppets and that you can always try again when you go wrong.

Logan - Performance

The best thing about the day was when we did the actual performance because we had a real audience and it was a lot of fun. The worst part was when it finished. I would like to know more in the future. Children should look forward to this exciting visit.

Stephen - Puppet Making

[I learnt that] it was ok to be individual, all our soldiers looked a bit different and that is ok.

Jamie - Composition

There is nothing that could be better it was the best. I got to learn how to make rhythms and beats.

Evie-Nicole - Costumed Interpreter

I learnt from this activity that the French called the Germans Alboche and the British also called them Boche which means cabbage in French. The French called the Germans cabbage because they have a big round head like a cabbage.

Evie-Nicole - Composition

I learnt that in the trenches they weren’t allowed to write in their letters exactly where they were so they had no privacy.

Maddie - Artefact Handling

I was able to touch things that you can’t touch in museums, which meant I learned a lot more

Willow Lane Primary School, Lancaster

2 May – 23 June


LETTER FROM HERBERT MORRIS  WILLOW LANE PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear Mother and Father,

 

This is the last time you will hear from me.

The last of my voice, my writing, my life and soul.

 

I hear gunfire ringing in my ears

Huge shells make deafening noises…

I bite my lip until I draw dark red blood

The whistle blows, opening a gateway to death.

 

My friend was shot. He screamed in horror. His eyes shut.

We tried to wake him but we couldn’t.

That night, my eyes melted with tears and I felt like I drowned.

 

I am troubled in my head and cannot stand the sound of those blasted guns.

They rattle all around in my head until I am nothing but war and ghosts.

But no one will help me for it.

I am lost.

There’s an ocean in my head.

My mind’s a broken nightmare.

I am lost.

 

Without thought I did something stupid. Very stupid.

I didn’t want to run away. But I had to.

I just couldn’t live like this.

I knew the consequences but I broke the rules.

 

I am sat in my dark and gloomy cell.

I am to be shot at dawn.

 

When you read this, I’ll be watching over you.

 

Herbert Morris


Claire Clarke - Teacher

I cannot fault the team effort on the day. The creative team did a fantastic job sorting the children out. They were a slick, well rehearsed crew who knew how to get the very best out of our children. The children worked hard, listened hard and loved taking part in the show. Please come back and do another one.

Caitlyn - Composition

[The best thing was] that you got to make your own songs and you got all your ideas listened to. [I learnt] how to sing properly and how to actully compose a song and know what its like to compose a song.

Daisy - Costumed Interpreter

Well for one, I learnt that life being a soldier is hard and the drills are very tricky. Secondly I learnt that soldiers are not allowed to pack much when they go to the trenches.

Marcus - Puppet Making

I liked how it evolved from the beginning to how it was in the end – seeing our puppets grow

Claire Clarke - Teacher

Thank you to everyone at HMDT and LCC for their efforts and organisation. We have had a great term learning about WW1 and Trench Brothers. I cannot believe the experiences both children and adults have enjoyed for such a bargain price. We would love to do similar projects in the future. Thank you once again and congratulations on a job well done.

Pawel - Puppet Making

I learnt not to give up and always believe in yourself that you can do great things in life

Tori - Performance

We loved the performance and it felt good to perform for other people. And we loved the t-shirts. We learnt that we could perform in front of lots of people. If you do this prodject then you will have great fun

Caitlyn - Costumed Interpreter

Fun, amazing, flabbergasting (which means the best!) There was nothing bad about this activity. It was just fantasic and we loved it. Thank you for coming!

Callum - Composition

[I learnt] how to compose music (I now want to be a professional singer when I’m older!)

Libby - Artefact Handling

I loved seeing the shot gun it was legendary! and I learned that we shouldn’t laugh about the war because it is sad what happened to the soldiers.

Pilling St. John’s Primary School, Pilling

25 April – 20 June

LETTER FROM JOSEPH CLOUGH PILLING ST. JOHN’S PRIMARY

Doctor White,

 

How I miss you old chum,

 

Living in a bombed-out mud puddle,

The night sky explodes with fireworks –

If only that’s what they were….

 

Oh how I miss London

Oh how I miss London

Even the black factory smoke

The men here, grubbier than the boys from the coal mines.

 

You would be so proud –

I’m one of the only Jamaicans allowed to drive the field ambulance.

I’ve proved Sir Arthur Slogget wrong

And shown I do have the strength and courage.

I do have the strength and courage.

 

The soldiers here have a lifetime bond

We’re like brothers

Colour and race do not play a part in the trenches.

But their mood is subdued

And they are petrified

Tomorrow they go over the top

 

Goodbye my oldest friend

It would mean so much if you could write back to me.

 

You would be so proud –

I’m one of the only Jamaicans allowed to drive the field ambulance.

I’ve proved Sir Arthur Slogget wrong

And shown I do have the strength and courage.

I do have the strength and courage.

 

Your old chauffeur

 

Joseph Clough


Sally Astbury - Teacher

It has been an honour to work on this project and the children have got a lot from it. Some children were disappointed that they didn’t get the chance to get a speaking part. The final performance was very professional and there were many positive comments from parents and governors saying how much they enjoyed it. One parent said that it was the best school performance he had seen!

Twiga - Performance

I learnt that singing in front of a crowd is not all bad. I hope we can do something like this next year.

Kelly - Artefact Handling

I learnt about what they used the war and that Indians came to help England.

Hayley - Puppet Making

I liked making the puppets, seeing everyone else’s puppets different looks and operating my puppet in the performance

Sally Astbury - Teacher

The children were able to experience the process involved in song writing. It demystified it and allowed the children to take ownership of their own song.

Abbie - Composition

I loved the activity, I don’t think there was anything bad about it.

Oliver - Costumed Interpreter

I learnt that soldiers from India wrote a lot of letters to their family members or friends back home. They were proud to fight for England.


 

IMG_0824 (1)

IMG_0819 (1) OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_0829 (1)

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_0825 (1)


OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIMG_0845 (1) IMG_0840 (1)IMG_0828 (1) IMG_0827 (1)IMG_0822 (1) IMG_0821 (1)

St. John’s Cliviger C of E Primary School, Burnley

28 April – 13 June


LETTER FROM GEORGE BLACKMAN  ST. JOHN’S CLIVIGER PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear Family,

It’s very cold in France.

I’m so excited to get back home,

I can’t wait to get back home,

And feel the warm sun on my skin.

 

The cold, muddy, dusty trenches give me pain.

Infested with rats, I’m covered in chats.

Lemon bombs have been raining down.

 

Dear Family,

It’s very cold in France.

I’m so excited to get back home,

I can’t wait to get back home,

And feel the warm sun on my skin.

 

I’m feeling funky because my best friend buzzed.

But I have to stay brave –

I am a soldier of the British Army.

 

I can’t wait until I’m with you again

I miss you every day.

I will stay brave and strong

And I will come home.

 

Yours

George Blackman


Chris Allton - Teacher

The children really got a sense of what it must have been like for new recruits. This developed their descriptive writing immensely. Very impressed.

Zara - Performance

We got to sing with professional singers. I had a very good time and I would like to do it again.

Erin - Puppet Making

Everyone mostly enjoy themselves and everyone got involeved. They also got to share all their ideas

Molly - Costumed Interpreter

[I learnt] what it was like to be in the war and that the leader wasn’t allowed to wear dirty underpants!

Harvey P - Composition

I think that the best thing during this lesson was when we write our own letter then formed it in to a magnificent sound and it also made us think.

Jane - Artefact Handling

I liked it all because I learnt lots of facts and even got to try on some clothes from the First World War. I enjoyed trying on the putties even though they were slightly big . It was hilarious when I tried on some of the glasses they used to wear!

Chris Allton - Teacher

Could not believe the amount of time and resources provided to the school and the final product at the end. The children are fascinated with WW1 now and keen to learn more but also developed a greater understanding and respect. Excellent and highly recommended to any school. The project will give high quality education and more to the children and school as a whole.

Annabelle - Performance

I thought doing the show/performance was the best part. I loved doing mostly everything if it was up to me I wouldn’t change anything about it.

Lucy - Puppet Making

I learnt that you can create anything with a little imagination and some materials.

Erin - Costumed Interpreter

It felt so realistic and it made me feel like I was there and although I knew it was an actor I still enjoyed it.

Simone - Composition

Some of us got to try and play the piano which was fun. Making our own music masterpiece was exciting.

Jessica - Artefact Handling

The best things were trying on the uniforms, when I tried on the glasses and hurting my foot when I tried to kick the really heavy football!

St. Augustine Primary School, Preston

21 April – 22 June


LETTER FROM KULBIR THAPA  ST. AUGUSTINE’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear family,

 

It is very cold in France,

But when I think about you, I feel all warm inside.

 

Every day more mud covers me up to my knees.

Gun shots whizz through the air like lightning.

 

A whistle sent us over the top

The grenades just came out of nowhere.

Through the mud, I saw a soldier still alive.

I could not leave him, so stayed with him all night.

 

Every day more mud covers me up to my knees.

Gun shots whizz through the air like lightning.

 

At day break I left him safely in a shell crater

But found two more wounded soldiers
And carried them to safety before returning to save my friend.

 

Every day more mud covers me up to my knees.

Gun shots whizz through the air like lightning.

 

As I carried them past the wounded bodies and bloodied mud
The Germans stopped shooting and instead, cheered us on.

That moment keeps replaying in my head.

 

Every day more mud covers me up to my knees.

Gun shots whizz through the air like lightning.

 

I miss you and pray every day that I will see you again.

 

Yours lovingly

 

Kulbir Thapa


Ruby Patel - Teacher

A great understanding and empathy about the British colonies as well as promoting tolerance, identity and pride concerning each other. HMDT Music and their artists were phenomenal to see in action and work with. It is brilliant for children to see specialists in their own field. This has inspired them into thinking about careers in Art, music, singing and acting etc.

Ruby Patel - Teacher

When the children wrote their diary extract, they wrote descriptively and passionately about their experience of being a soldier in the British army.

Harris - Overall

I found everything really good. I don’t think anything needs to be improved – the sound effects of the lemon drop bombs in the play were really scary!

Aleyah - Puppet Making

I enjoyed getting to make the turban for our little puppet. I was so glad we got to use them in the performance and then keep them!

Muskaan - Compostion

I learnt a lot about the First World War and now know a lot more from being able to write a song about the trenches.

Ayhem - Composition

The best thing about the activity was that we learnt even in letters if changed a bit and sung, it actually becomes lyrics to a song. YOU CAN MAKE MUSIC FROM ANYTHING

Michelle - Overall

[I learnt] how much respect people the soldiers had to have for each other.

St. Wulstan’s & St. Edmund’s Primary School, Fleetwood

24 April – 21 June


LETTER FROM EUGENT CLARKE   ST. WULSTAN’S & ST. EDMUND’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear Aunt, dear Aunt,

 

I’m writing from the cold, soggy trenches

Where I’m constantly in danger,

But strangely feel protected.

 

In the silence of the night it is scary;

Foul smelling smoke blowing throughout the frosty winter night.

Rats bite!

As we slumber in our ghastly cubby holes.

 

Dear Aunt, dear Aunt,

 

I miss you terribly

And I wish I was at home in the sun,

Playing beach ball

Or eating Jerk chicken.

Playing beach ball

Or eating Jerk chicken.

 

I miss you, terribly.

But I know I’m earning fam’ly money.

 

My job is to carry toffee apples and bullets to the soldiers;

I’d rather fight than deliver ammunition.

But us black men, us can’t have guns, which doesn’t seem fair!

 

On the journey here, we were consumed by a huge blizzard

And most of us were wearing shorts and caught frostbite.

Legs turning black, needing to be amputated.

It was terrible!

 

Ev’ry day I wake up, and wonder is this my last?

 

Love from

Eugent Clarke


Stan - Puppet Making

the best thing about this activity was when we made the puppets and played with them. i learnt that i need to take my time when im doing something so i can do it right.

Sadie - Costumed Interpreter

We got to see what life for the solders were like and I think it was a little scary and bossy for them. [I learnt] that life as a solider was very difficult and that they were treated with no respect what so ever; especially for doing the most simplest of things like gnawing, coughing and slouching. They missed their family.

Simon Clough - Teacher

Brilliant singers, organizers and directors. They loved seeing all stage and realistic props as well as costumed soldiers again. Luca is normally shy but got a main part and performed brilliantly.

Ruby R - Composition

The best thing about it was that he described all of the notes and he would play it three time after we finished that section so we could remember and understand the tune. Over all this was my favorite part of working with the Trench Brothers.

Evie - Composition

[It was] creative, pleasurable and heart pounding.

Ruby - Artefact Handling

I liked to see the weapons and things like the glasses and masks also I liked that each table was set out with different topics like the clothes on one table and the food on another

Arabella - Performance

The best thing was to be able to put all our hard work into this play. I also like the fact that I was acting and having a director.

Simon Clough - Teacher

Over and above my expectations. They’ve learnt so much about WW1 and the ethnic minority soldiers who we probably wouldnt have focused on before. I’ve learn lots of new facts and was naive about the impact Commonwealth soldiers had during WW1. Thank you once again “

Jayden - Puppet Making

The best thing was all of it because expands our minds into doing new stuff we have never done before.

Jorja - Costumed Interpreter

[The best thing was] how he acted so realistic and it was so unique and it was exciting. Also all the activities we did were really fun. We learnt that the soldiers from WW1 were really strict and were very hard on the soldiers. Also Thank you !!! for teaching us all of this.

Millie - Costumed Interpreter

I think that the best part was where we got to find out things that we didn’t know and where we got to touch things and look at things that we didn’t really know before like the leg bandages called putty and we had a challenge to try and put them on.

Worsthorne Primary School, Burnley

28 April -16 June


LETTER FROM WALTER TULL  WORSTHORNE PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dear brother,

I hope things are going well with you in Glasgow.
I trust upon my return, you can repair my teeth!

 

I’m writing to you from a cold, muddy trench.
Sleeping here, in the rat-infested conditions, it’s a living nightmare.

 

We’re under constant attack, we’re under constant attack!
The sound of gunfire’s even louder than the roar at White Hart Lane.
Conditions are so awful that the land turned into a mud bath
The Germans bombing our trenches like demons.

 

I’m so proud to become the first black officer to lead white soldiers into battle.
Being a footballer has helped me guide my men
We work as a team and look out for each other.

 

When I arrived, some soldiers treated me badly because of the colour of my skin.
Just like the match at Bristol
But now I have earned their respect, we are like brothers.

 

I’m so proud to become the first black officer to lead white soldiers into battle.
Being a footballer has helped me guide my men
We work together as a team and look out for each other.

 

Dear brother, I must prepare for battle.
I am so proud to lead my brave pals.
Please pray for when we will be reunited.

Your loving brother

Lance – Sergeant Walter Tull


Logan - Puppet Making

It was so important learning about the uniforms by making it ourselves. I learnt what the soldiers looked like and wore and the puppets were accurate so were more fun.

Justine North - Teacher

As a school located in a traditionally ‘White English’ village, we often find our children and families have little knowledge or empathy with other cultures. It has been valuable for our school to embrace the contributions made to the war effort by Black soldiers. thank you – an amazing experience for us all

Freya - Composition

We loved it. Lucy was so lovely and made it easy for us to do.

Lucas - Artefacts Handling

I had lots of fun trying on the uniforms and puttees and looking at the rifle.

Brody - Performance

The best part was performing with the puppets, getting to keep the t-shirt, meeting the actors.

Justine North - Teacher - Composition

They learned that they can be song writers and composers. They gained confidence to sing in front of their peers and were proud to have their ideas included in the song.

Alfie - Artefacts Handling

I liked trying on the uniforms, looking at the footballs and learning about the rifle.

Reedley Primary School, Burnley

19 April – 14 June


LETTER FROM HARDIT SINGH MALIK            REEDLEY PRIMARY SCHOOL

Dearest Mother,

I’m writing to reassure you – I’m doing just fine.
The cuts have healed.

 

You will be so proud that I’m a pilot:
They call me the ‘Flying Hobgoblin’ because of my helmet.
I’m tired and cold, flying so many missions.
But my brothers,
Oh, my brothers are helping me.

 

Showers of bullets thunder to the ground.
The cries of the wind give an ear piercing sound.
When I am flying up above, I hear the raging battle below.

 

The nearby trenches are cold and damp,
I feel for the blighters sleeping there, protecting us.
In the blink of an eye, bullets howl to the ground,
The shrieking iron making it impossible to sleep.

 

Today Britain and India have stood proud,
Smiling like true men.
Our allies stand there, with overwhelming pride,
Patrolling the skies
To keep the horrid Hun at bay.
Arrow hand forward, dismiss to side

 

Please don’t worry about me – I’m fine.

Your affectionate son

Hardit Singh Malik


Alisha - Composition Session

The best thing was that we got to make the letter into our own song and had actions to remember the words.

Ali- Hamza - Performance

The best part of the day was the acting, as I had one of the main parts and got to interact with the other actors, which may change my life choices to becoming an actor.

Alisha - Puppet Making

The best thing is when we painted the head and added the eyes and lips because you could make the character come to life.

Shehnaz - Costumed Interpreter

We got to experience what the Indian soldiers had to do before the war. I enjoyed learning things in new languages. I learnt the different commandments the Havildar called out in Hindi and Punjabi.

Hafifa - Artefacts Handling

The best thing about this activity was when we held and wore the artefacts because I felt as if I were in the war.

Alisha - Costumed Interpreter

The best thing was that we learnt how to be a sepoi. We learnt the hard way of being the sepoi and how they lived in the war. I learnt how strict the Indian army had to be with their sepois. I also learnt instructions and drills and how they earnt stripes.

Malikah - Composition

I learnt that music is something everyone can.

Hafifa - Artefact Handling

Getting to hold and wear the artefacts felt as if I were in the war.

Shehnaz - Puppet Making

The best part was when we made the head because it was fun and challenging. I learnt how to make a cap using different techniques.

Colette Hardman - Teacher

This project met all my expectations and more. The experience the children have had is something they may not have again. The quality of the staff from HMDT music and Lancashire County Council has been exceptional. They have been in constant contact and produced a high quality of learning. HMDT Music and artists have been fantastic. they have helped every step of the way.


image1

Untitled-1

Inspired by the Trench Brothers project, students from Reedley made this fantastically detailed model of a trench.

Reedley6c Reedley5c Reedley4c Reedley3c Reedley2c

New School Summer 2015

4 December 2014

http://vimeo.com/user5645054/add link here

 


 

TITLE IN CAPS        

 

SCHOOL NAME IN CAPS

 

 

 

Text style

Text style

 


 

 

Testimonial text – Name

 

<hr />

&nbsp;

<strong>LETTER FROM WALTER TULL           </strong>

<strong> </strong>

<strong>FIRS FARM PRIMARY SCHOOL</strong>

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Before I led men in to a football match, now I lead them in to a war.

The sky is now dark, the goals have changed, my aim is now to survive.

There are still two teams attack and defence,

But the cheer of the crowd is now the shrieks of dying men.

&nbsp;

We’re not kicking balls, we’re firing guns,

And we’re not losing goals, we’re losing friends.

And this lush pitch of fresh, green grass is covered by mud, blood and fire; a battle field.

I see that life is not a game any more.

I know my life is not a game any more.

&nbsp;

Life in the trenches is terrible especially the rats!

Twice the size of an over grown cat. <em>         </em>

Not to mention the pesky lice, I spend all day scratching.

It’s dark, damp and cold, but never lonely.

The lads are always laughing, cheering us from being in the dumps.

&nbsp;

Home now seems a million miles away

How I wish I could be somewhere else.

Edward, if I die or if I survive,

I’ll see you on the other side.

&nbsp;

From your loving brother,

&nbsp;

Walter Tull.

&nbsp;

<hr />

&nbsp;

&nbsp;

Children really enjoyed the music making as it was from their own ideas “I liked it because we got to change the song and the speed of each song” – Staff at Firs Farm School

&nbsp;

Puppetry: Excellent imaginative, art skills learnt. Visionary ideas alongside the practical D &amp; T element. – Staff at Firs Farm School

It has added more of the creative, artistic side to our teaching and built our singing confidence. – Staff at Firs Farm School

Creative arts and the theatrical element were fantastic for the final performance. – Staff at Firs Farm School

I learnt how soldiers felt during the war. – David, student at Firs Farm School

The best things was when we got to hold the guns because if we go to a museum we see guns but don’t hold them. – Lucas, student at Firs Farm School

It would of been nice to of held more world war one equipment but I was drawn to the weapons station as I was intrigued with the stunning view of the guns. – Jake, student at Firs Farm School

I liked touching the objects and feeling the feelings that the soldiers had to face. – David, student at Firs Farm School

We got to show what we can do in design and technology. – Yasmin, student at Firs Farm School

I learnt that many, many people risked their lives to protect our country. – Yasmin, student at Firs Farm School

Writing the song was awesome, creative and cool. – Arda , student at Firs Farm School

The overall experience was awesome! – Yusuf, student at Firs Farm School

Trench Brothers is amazing! – Kostadina, student at Firs Farm School

I want to do it all over again! – Brooke, student at Firs Farm School

It was brilliant, fantastic, creative, artistic, interesting – the best! – Student at Firs Farm School

<hr />

&nbsp;
<div class=”issuuembed” style=”width: 650px; height: 459px;” data-configid=”8986754/11293451″></div>
<script src=”//e.issuu.com/embed.js” async=”true” type=”text/javascript”></script>

&nbsp;
<h2 class=”p1″><img class=”alignnone wp-image-134 size-full” src=”http://www.hmdt.org.uk/hmdtmusic/legacytrenchbrothers/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2014/11/141204_FirsFarm_01.png” alt=”141204_FirsFarm_01″ width=”710″ height=”90″ /></h2>
<p class=”p1″></p>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

141204_FirsFarm_01

Firs Farm Primary School, Enfield

4 December 2014

 


 

LETTER FROM WALTER TULL          

 

FIRS FARM PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

 

Before I led men in to a football match, now I lead them in to a war.

The sky is now dark, the goals have changed, my aim is now to survive.

There are still two teams attack and defence,

But the cheer of the crowd is now the shrieks of dying men.

 

We’re not kicking balls, we’re firing guns,

And we’re not losing goals, we’re losing friends.

And this lush pitch of fresh, green grass is covered by mud, blood and fire; a battle field.

I see that life is not a game any more.

I know my life is not a game any more.

 

Life in the trenches is terrible especially the rats!

Twice the size of an over grown cat.         

Not to mention the pesky lice, I spend all day scratching.

It’s dark, damp and cold, but never lonely.

The lads are always laughing, cheering us from being in the dumps.

 

Home now seems a million miles away

How I wish I could be somewhere else.

Edward, if I die or if I survive,

I’ll see you on the other side.

 

From your loving brother,

 

Walter Tull.

 


 

 

Children really enjoyed the music making as it was from their own ideas “I liked it because we got to change the song and the speed of each song” – Staff at Firs Farm School

 

Puppetry: Excellent imaginative, art skills learnt. Visionary ideas alongside the practical D & T element. – Staff at Firs Farm School

It has added more of the creative, artistic side to our teaching and built our singing confidence. – Staff at Firs Farm School

Creative arts and the theatrical element were fantastic for the final performance. – Staff at Firs Farm School

I learnt how soldiers felt during the war. – David, student at Firs Farm School

The best things was when we got to hold the guns because if we go to a museum we see guns but don’t hold them. – Lucas, student at Firs Farm School

It would of been nice to of held more world war one equipment but I was drawn to the weapons station as I was intrigued with the stunning view of the guns. – Jake, student at Firs Farm School

I liked touching the objects and feeling the feelings that the soldiers had to face. – David, student at Firs Farm School

We got to show what we can do in design and technology. – Yasmin, student at Firs Farm School

I learnt that many, many people risked their lives to protect our country. – Yasmin, student at Firs Farm School

Writing the song was awesome, creative and cool. – Arda , student at Firs Farm School

The overall experience was awesome! – Yusuf, student at Firs Farm School

Trench Brothers is amazing! – Kostadina, student at Firs Farm School

I want to do it all over again! – Brooke, student at Firs Farm School

It was brilliant, fantastic, creative, artistic, interesting – the best! – Student at Firs Farm School


 

 

141204_FirsFarm_01

Colvestone Primary School, Hackney

3 December 2014

 


 


 

Letter from Eugent Clark

 

Dear Aunty,

 

I’m missing everyone

I can’t wait to come back home.

It’s freezing like an ice cube

I can’t wait to come back home.

 

We ran into a blizzard

It was the first time we’d ever seen snow.

The conditions have been terrible.

It was the first time we’d ever seen snow.

 

The food is cold and wet

Almost as cold and wet as I am

But I don’t regret my decision.

 

All I do is rebuild the trenches,

Stock ammunitions, fill up the sandbags

Clean the latrines.

Kill the rats, collect the bodies

Bury the dead. Risk my life!

 


 

Dear Aunty,

 

I’m proud to know that I’m making a difference

And the Empire is in need of my support.

I rebuild trenches without complaining but it’s back-breaking work.

The horrible weather and the sound of gunfire keep me awake.

I can’t help but think of Jamaica

Homesick for the sun on my bones.

 

I miss jerk chicken, playing ball in my yard

Salty sea water, sizzling sun.

Tropical trees, smooth sand,

Joy, my sweetheart.

I miss my family.

 

You were right, we’re just German bait.

We’re just German bait.

I only pray that I see you soon.

You’ll put a smile on my face.

 

Your ever loving nephew,

 

Eugent Clarke


 

The Costume Interpreter enabled students to use a personal viewpoint in their writing. The project met and exceeded expectations – the work produced over the project was of a fantastic quality. – Staff at Colvestone School


 

I learned a lot about how life was back then which really intrigued me and I thought was very interesting. – Beatrice, Year 6 student at Colvestone School

Artfects Workshop: It was brilliant – we got to hold old medals and put on funny clothes. – Layla, Year 5 student at Colvestone School

Artfects Workshop: We got to hold the artefacts and wear the soldier uniforms! We got to hold the guns! Maksymillian & Columba, Year 5 students at Colvestone School

Artfects Workshop: I learned how well preserved things from the war were and what the conditions were like for the majority of soldiers. Max, Year 6 student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: It was easier to understand because the soldier was acting like it was 1918. Max, Year 6 student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: The best thing was when he showed us the games they used to play in WW1. – Melvin, Year 6 student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: I enjoyed making our puppets and seeing them come to life in the end. Beatrice, Year 6 student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: Trench brothers was one of the best projects ever. – Lily, student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: Friendship is how you win. – Lana, Year 5 student at Colvestone School

Costumed Interpreter: It is a very good idea to get children in Primary Schools to learn about the war and how was fought. This was an interesting way of teaching it. – Freddie, Year 6 student at Colvestone School


 


 

Walker Primary School, Enfield

2 December 2014

 


 

LETTER FROM SHER SINGH RANA                           WALKER PRIMARY SCHOOL

 

Dearest Mother and Father,

 

Rain is thrashing down here in France.

The trenches are cold and damp, but we survive them

But we survive them.

 

How is everyone doing in our sweet home in Nepal?

How are the crops?

Good weather?

 

The weather is atrocious, it is raining every day.

I have to twist my clothes to drain the water out.

I’m infected with vile body lice

And had the chats ­seven times.

 

I have seen unspeakable things.

Yesterday a flying pig hit our trench

And many of our men were blown apart .

My best friend was buzzed. It was a terrible battle.

 

I lost a dear friend

There are none left.

I am a changed man

Seeing all these terrible things.

 

I cannot thank you enough for the extra clothes,

The lovely family pictures have kept my spirits up.

 

I’m counting the days till I see you.

 

Your loving son,

 

Sher Singh Rana

 


 

The Costumed Interpreter session improved their empathy and sense of time. It helped when writing about life in the trenches. – Staff at Walker School

The artefacts session was excellent it taught the importance of artefacts with the children wearing gloves. They felt the real equipment and got a sense of what it was like to have these things. – Staff at Walker School

The children performed and sang really well – it gave them an understanding and grasp of the impact of war. – Staff at Walker School

The project gave a huge feeling of pride at being able to tell a story respectfully and giving the soldiers the recognition they deserve. – Staff at Walker School

It gave a better appreciation of the sacrifices that were made, and a vastly improved knowledge of the participation of soldiers from the Commonweatlth countries and their roles. – Staff at Walker School

It was very well organised. – Staff at Walker School

You got to wear the clothes and hold the guns and bullets. – Ananya, student at Walker School

You can tell a story just from a picture. – Priyanka, student at Walker School

The weapons were amazing because they were actually real. – Rupainya, student at Walker School

I learned how to make a puppet and actually started to make one at home. – student at Walker School

Composition: It was nice that people listened to your opinion. – Rana , student at Walker School

Composition: I learnt how to fit lines into musical tunes and choosing the tune. – Guy, student at Walker School

Composition: It was great having a chance to speak up on what you want to sing – the joy when we finished writing it. – Hannah, student at Walker School

Composition: I really enjoyed writing the songs. – Yasemin, student at Walker School

Composition: We spent a long time practising for the performance and it paid off. I learnt how horrible the First World War was and how emotional it was when someone died. It was amazing. – Manolo, student at Walker School

I absolutely loved it! – Guy, student at Walker School

Composition: The puppets were really cool and I enjoyed singing. – Yasemin, student at Walker School

Composition: I think another school should do this project. – Ananya, student at Walker School

 


 

141202_Walker_01

Our Lady of Lourdes Primary School, Enfield

1 December 2014


 

 


 

LETTER FROM HUKUM SINGH                                  OUR LADY OF LOURDES SCHOOL

 

Dear Sister,

 

I’m writing from a smelly, broken stable.

My duties are to manage all the animals and deliver all the rations.

 

I’m using horses and carts to transport food and supplies

But unfortunately last night, one of our horses died.

Many horses have been killed; a real tragedy, and very sad to see.

We are running out of supplies.

 

The war is dreadful.

Dead bodies in the trenches

Burnt bodies buried in buckets of blood.

Ev’ry night, shrill screams of dying soldiers.

Burnt bodies buried in buckets of blood.

Worn by intensity of battle.

 

With God’s grace, I’ve been spared.

I miss you dearly, and hope you are proud of me.

 

Your loving brother,

 

Major Hukum Singh

Commanding Officer of the Jaipur Imperial Service Transport Corps

 


 

It gave first hand experience of artefacts and brought the past to life. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School

Literacy and history were used mainly – the Education Zone gave good detail and background information. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School

Children saw a song grow and develop giving an understanding of how music can be put together. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School

They learned history almost from first hand experience. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School

The Costumed Interpreter gave insight into the life of a soldier for them to write their letters and develop their understanding. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School

The project brought the whole school and parents together for the performance which received excellent feedback. – Staff at Our Lady of Lourdes School


 

Gayhurst Community School, Hackney

27-28 November 2014

 


 

LETTER FROM HARDIT SINGH MALIK                   
 
GAYHURST COMMUNITY SCHOOL YEAR 5

Dear Mother,

 

Here is something amazing: I learnt to fly in only one month!

Everyone calls me ‘The Flying Hobgoblin’.

I prefer it in the air,

The wind rushing past,

A great view below,

And you see much less suffering from up here.

 

I fought with the ‘Red Baron’,

Who everybody fears.

My plane was riddled with bullets,

I feel proud about that, proud about that.

 

Every time I shoot down a pilot,

I feel an air of guilt and pride.

The bullets will stay,
To remind me of my pain.

 

This war has ruined men’s lives.

I let down a tear of sadness.

The bags under my eyes are like paper torn to shreds.

I have never forgotten my faith, never forgotten my faith, despite all I’ve seen.

 

When the war ends,

And I hope it does soon,

I will rush home to India.

I hope to be back soon.

 

Your loving son,

Hardit Singh Malik

 

 


 

 

LETTER FROM HERBERT MORRIS                           
 
GAYHURST COMMUNITY SCHOOL YEAR 6

 

 

 

Dear Ma and Pa,

 

I’ve been here a while now,

And to be honest,

I don’t think I can stand it much longer.

 

I hear the sound of gunfire, bombs exploding all around me.

Bullets whistling thorough the air, soldiers screaming, begging for their lives.

 

I miss you all back home: Pa’s stories, Polly’s lies,

Your home cooked meals, and most of all, my comfy bed.

My comfy bed.

 

I feel like I’m losing my mind

But I’m afraid to admit it.

Am I a coward?
Coward?

Coward?

 

Exploding bombs shatter the peaceful night.

Shooting bullets zoom overhead,

Zoom overhead like lightning.

 

I enter the world of foggy gas, swirling around the air.

Sharp shrapnel scrapes past my dry, dark skin,

At night here, the sky lights up like a firework display.

A bomb brings us back to reality, to reality.

 

Will I ever hear the sound of birds

Gracefully singing as calm as the sea?

Will I ever feel the sparkling sun

Caress my face, caress my face?

 

Pray for me as I do for you.

 

Your loving son

Herbert Morris


 

Letter Excerpts from 6W

Dear Ma and Pa,

As you know I’ve been here for a while now, and to be honest I don’t think I can stand it much longer. As I write to you now I can hear the sound of gunfire and bombs exploding around me. Bullets whistling thorough the air, soldiers screaming nearly begging for their lives.

How’s Polly doing? Is she still missing me? Please let her know that I’m missing her badly and I think of her all the time. As a matter of fact I miss all of you lot back home. Pa’s stories, Polly’s lies, your home cooked meals and my most of all my comfy bed. I’d pay anything to have that all back. We’re woken up at 05:00, given bread and water around about 07:00 hours all the while prone to attack.

I’m not doing very well here. I’m stressed in these trenches; they’re cramped and make me feel claustrophobic. I feel like I’m losing my mind but I’m just too afraid to admit to it for fear of my squad calling me a coward. The doctors haven’t been very helpful either they’ve just told me that I need to get use to the war it will be over soon

The smell is just as bad, it’s unbearable; it’s a mixture of blood, fear, sweat, tears and the rotting dead. There are no words that I can use to describe it.

On a more cheerful note, thanks for the parcel the socks are giving me great pleasure. Some of the items you sent were taken by the officers, apparently they’re not allowed (but I know the truth). I’ve placed the picture in my pocket note book next to my heart and it goes everywhere with me.

I must end now, pray for me as I always for you.

Your loving son

 

Herbie

 


 

Letter Home 1

Dearest Mum and Dad,

I am well, as always, physically anyway. I hope all is well with you and the family. The conditions within my regiment are terrible. We have to sleep wherever we can, even standing up! The food is also atrocious, it tastes like cardboard.   My pangs of hunger are sometimes as sharp as the bullets that whizz past.

 

I often hear the screams of men, allies and Germans. I had to go to the hospital today as a stray piece of shrapnel broke my thumb. The pain is like nothing I have ever experienced! I have never seen anything like what I am witnessing. Friends I have made have been shot before my eyes. Barbarically twisted webs of barbed wire have pierced skin and maimed limbs. Sometimes I want to curl up and wait for it to be over. Bombs scream overhead, shattering bodies.

 

I feel terrible about shooting the Bosche, even though it’s for my country. However, there is one disgusting thing, the rats… They are everywhere! They nibble feet and take chunks out of hands; I once saw a rat the size of a cat, scuttling around the trench.

 

The propaganda is false. There is nothing patriotic about living in this filth.

I wish all the best to you back in Blighty. I will come back, I promise.

 

All my Love,

Will

 


 

Letter Home

 

Dear Mother and Father,

 

I am as well as I can be under the circumstances. I hope all is well with the family. No matter what happens, I am going to be alright, so, I hope, are you.

 

I have just been moved back from the front line. All is solemn. Even the light-hearted are serious, although at times we enjoy a quiet song.

 

Shells rip through the air and bullets scream overhead. Like flies, the men around me fall.

 

The daily bombardment does not worry us in the least, and we have not suffered an attack yet, so the men are keen to go over the parapet and push back the merciless Germans.

 

Yesterday I received your parcel. Lots of men are getting trench foot. One man had to be sent on home leave because of a terrible case. His foot was eventually amputated. Luckily the socks prevent that from happening to me. Please make a pair for Walter; he is tragically wounded and has been placed in the infirmary.

 

At night here, the sky lights up like a firework display. We all gaze until a bomb jerks us back to reality.

 

I pray for your well-being every night and day. By any chance, I will see you again soon. Give my love to everyone.

 

May God be with us all,

From Your Loving Son,

Ralph

 


 

A Poem
The War

Exploding bombs shatter the peaceful night.

Shooting bullets zoom over my head as quick as lightning.

Who could want a life so bad, so sad,

so dreadful, so painful.

A life that lures you to death.

 

Heart beating uncontrollable, solemnity seizes my soul.

I enter the world of foggy gas, swirling around the air.

The sharp shrapnel brushes against my dry, dark skin,

Cuts all over me.

A cold river of blood flowing through the rocky trenches.

 

Where will my life lead me to next?

Will I ever hear the sound of birds gracefully singing

as calm as the sea?

Will I ever feel the sparkling sun caressing my face?

I wonder…

This is war!

 


 

 

The costumed interpreter gave a greater understanding of an Indian soldier’s life. – Staff at Gayhurst School

All of the children really enjoyed making puppets and all abilities could achieve. Children who were shy could take part confidently in the production with their puppets. – Staff at Gayhurst School

The children enjoyed singing their song and were really proud and enthusiastic. – Staff at Gayhurst School

The singing was great and the puppets looked brilliant on the day. – Staff at Gayhurst School

You got to learn new facts about the soldier. – Tiargo, student at Gayhurst School

It felt so amazing to be able to touch such special objects. – Cydney, student at Gayhurst School

Getting to make and move the puppets and make the face –being able to personalise your puppet. – Molly, student at Gayhurst School

We think that this experience was really fun and amazing and we would love to do it all over again. – Pau. student at Gayhurst School

I liked holding the gun, learning about the war and seeing the different medals people had won. George, student at Gayhurst School

You got to make your own puppet and take one home. It was well organised. They had all the bits ready and it was really easy to follow. It felt really confident about what I could do. – Tolga, student at Gayhurst School

Getting to preform and express ourselves and learning about that side of history. Demorio, student at Gayhurst School

We think that this experience was really fun and amazing and we would love to do it all over again. Leah , student at Gayhurst School

We loved this and want more of this to come to our school. We want more great performances! – Micah and Evie, students at Gayhurst School


 



141127_gayhurst_01

Starks Field Primary School, Enfield

26 November 2014

 


 

LETTER FROM KHUDADAD KHAN                         STARKS FIELD SCHOOL

 

 

Dear Mother,

 

I’m writing this letter from my post in Hollebeke.

Tomorrow we are moving to the front line.

I’m writing this now just in case…

 

Writing to you makes my days light up.

Tell me, have you harvested the crops yet?

Oh, and were there very many of them,

After the birds started eating them in spring?

 

I sleep in a hole and hear raindrops diving.

Instead of birds singing, I hear guns shooting.

Around me I hear thousands of bullets

Flying through the air with exhilarating speed.

 

I miss you and my family.

I’m determined to survive.

I don’t want to be here anymore.

 

The sounds;

The squelching of footsteps,

The noise of the crickets,

The galloping horses, closer to me and my brothers.

The cries of the innocent

The pain and the agony.

Explosions from bombs

Screaming from the blameless ones.

 

I miss you and my family.

I’m determined to survive.

I don’t want to be here anymore.

 

Dear Mother,

Every time I take a breath,

All I taste is blood.

 

Forever yours,

 

Khudadad Khan.

 


 

Student letter

Dear Family,

Please only read this letter when the rest of the family are there. I hope your doing fine at home without me. War is not a nice thing, and I have trench hand so it’s very hard to write.

My fingers are corrupting and it’s very painful. I’m trying to stay hopeful and in my free time I try and write to you. I write my friends letters as well because they can’t write, so I just have enough time to write to you before I go out to the front line in France.

My pencil is about 5cm long and I sharpen it with my knife. I hope to see you all again someday. Can you send me a picture of you and the family to keep me going? I wish I could see you right now and give you a big hub. Remember keep your head up (except if you are in the war.)

Yours sincerely,

Subedar-Khudadad Khan

By Aneesa

 


 

Student letter 2

Subedar Khudadad Khan

129th Baluchis

Hollebeke Ypres

France

 

8th August 1914

Dear Mother and Father,

Writing to you makes my miserable days light up in this dark grey place. I am writing this letter from my new base in Hollebeke, France. I needed to write this letter to you just in case … I do not make it back home. Anyways tomorrow is a very important day for our regiment as we are moving to the front line.

How is everyone? What have my dear sisters been doing? I wish I could come home but I have to do this for my king and country. This war is not glorious and has to be done with discipline. Maybe one day I will be able to come home and lead a normal life much like I used to do.

Life in the trenches is very different to life at home. To start with the food it treacherous and the living conditions are very much the same. We live in long, narrow holes called trenches and I think you will be proud to hear that we dug them ourselves. The trenches are water-logged and very muddy indeed. We spend two weeks at the front line, two weeks at the reserve line and one week where we have time to rest and do not have to do any work. We were told that this alternates throughout the year. Rats crawl all over us but we are used to that now. Although we have to live through these poor conditions I am happy to serve alongside my brothers.

The sounds of gunshots and grenades (large explosives) have become like the sound of leaves rustling in the trees. You are always hearing footsteps stopping and starting in an unbearable way. Tell me, have you harvested the crops yet? Oh and were there very many of them, after them pesky birds started eating them in spring? These past few weeks many of our men have fallen and screams of soldiers have also become like it is no different to a laugh.

Every time I take a breath all I taste is blood. There have been so many deaths so the stench of blood is everywhere. I estimate that there have been over 12,000 deaths. What can I say about the fires well, the smell of smoke hangs in the misty air?

Bullets fly through the air with such speed it is exhilarating

A couple of days ago I faced a severe injury while my regiment and I were using the machine guns to keep back the Germans. Everyone in my regiment had been run down. Seemingly I was the only one left. Whilst I was making my way back to the trenches I was unexpectedly shot in the leg. The Germans started to make their way forwards so I had to think of something quickly. I decided that I would pretend to be dead. I had to act dead until night fall. I stayed there until the battle had finished and the bullets stopped whizzing. I am alright now though.

Did you know that there are rats here as big as your fore-arm? And that we sometimes have to eat them. The weather is the opposite to India; cold, rainy and unfortunately the sun doesn’t shine in the same blistering way.

As you may already know war is violent and harsh. There are many corpses (dead bodies) but at least they do not have to be part of atrocious warfare.

As I say again I wish I could come back home to where I belong, in India.

I send all my love to the family

 

Lots of love Khudadad

-x-

 


 

Student letter 3

Sabedar Khudadad

129th Buluchis

Hollebeke

Ypres

France

8th August 1914

Dear mum:

I am writing this letter from Ypres. Mum I want you to know how I am doing.

 

Mum I can hear grenades booming everywhere and machine gun fire as loud and continuous as a hurricane. I sleep in a hole and I can hear rain drops diving onto the ground. When I wake up instead of hearing birds singing I hear guns shooting rapidly.

Every time in the trench you taste dirt in your mouth, the food is bitter and I just miss all your home made food. The smell is strong and you can smell horse poo and you can smell other strong smells.

Mum I can see wounded men crying in pain, every time I look around me and I just run for my life sometimes I try to help people but I can’t sometimes people drown in the mud but I can’t do anything.

I feel pain and I miss you and I just want to come back home, wear clean clothes and eat nice food. It did not look like this on the propaganda posters they sent us, the men the posters were happy but I’m certainly not happy.

Mum I want to ask you something, how are the children? Love and kisses mum, tell the young ones I love them, write back soon mum.

Your son Khudadad khan.                                                              Sabirin

 


 

Student letter 3

Subedar Khudadad Khan

129th Baluchis

Holebeke

Ypres

France

 

8th August 1914

 

Dear Mother,

I am writing this letter from my post in Hollebeke. The officers say that tomorrow will be an important day for our regiment. I am writing this now because I might not get to write again any time soon.

All around me I can hear thousands of bullets being shot. Grenades booming across the battlefield. The sound was almost deafening. The squelching of footsteps in the mud, the noise of the crickets chirping in between gun fire, the galloping footsteps of horses coming closer and closer to me and my brothers, the cries of the innocent and wounded soldiers lying in pain and agony in the mud, loud explosions from the bombs, rapid machine gun fire, screaming from the blameless ones. The badly wounded ones slowly dying, slowly saying their last words.

I can smell the smoke from the bombs. I can smell the gun powder and taste the gun powder and dirt from the trenches. I can taste the bitter taste from the food.

I can see the dead bodies from the soldiers as young as 16. Bullets flying past me, killing my brothers, the smoke and fire from the hand grenades, people hiding from the Germans because they are scared. They don’t want to die and neither do I. People are being carried away in stretchers, tears rolling down their faces. There is blood everywhere.

Mother I feel scared of moving in to the front line. I’m petrified. It wasn’t what I expected it to be. They said the war would be over by Christmas. I feel like I’m going to get blown to pieces. I want to be with my family. I want to go home. I miss you and my family. I’m determined to survive. I don’t want to be here anymore.

I hope to speak to you soon

Love from Khudadad                                 Shae

 


 

A great presentation from the Army museum – the children were all engaged. – Staff at Starks Field School

The learning zone has improved my subject knowledge greatly. It has enabled me to teach lessons in a fun and creative way, yet still meeting all the objectives set out in the National Curriculum. – Staff at Starks Field School

The puppetry session was so interactive. The final puppets are amazing! The whole school has been commenting on them! – Staff at Starks Field School

The song was owned by the children. They led the direction that the song would take and have been singing the song ever since. It has given them pride! – Staff at Starks Field School

The project went beyond my expectations. I didn’t expect the children to get as much out of it as they ended up getting. It has made the students very respectful of all that happened in WW1 and it has opened them up to the history of the British Empire and their involvement within the war. – Staff at Starks Field School

I learnt how different cultures adapted to the war e.g. Sikhs and their beliefs. – Kaya, student at Starks Field School

I learnt how to hold a rifle correctly. – Bartek, student at Starks Field School

I learnt about the different commands given in the army. – Khadijah, student at Starks Field School

We learnt how to walk like a soldier. – Oyku, student at Starks Field School

I gathered lots of information about Khudadad Khan and realised just how hard it was in the war. – Ellisia, student at Starks Field School

We really enjoyed it. Thank you Trench Brothers! – Student at Starks Field School


 


 

141126_starksfield_01